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Update , 13.30 The Kaikoura earthquake on Monday 14th November http://www.geonet.org.nz/quakes/2016p858000 was the largest recorded in New Zealand since the M7.8 Dusky Sound earthquake in 2009. But, given its location, it was more widely felt and more damaging. This earthquake unsettled many, many people and that is perfectly normal; earthquakes can be upsetting events. The best advice we have is to be prepared for earthquakes.…
One hazard we don’t often get an opportunity to talk about at GeoNet is landslides. That’s a good thing, we aren’t complaining. But with the M7.8 Kaikoura Earthquake, landslides and land deformation have been at the forefront of risk to communities living in North Canterbury and Marlborough. Our landslide and paleoseismology teams quickly took to the skies to spot landslides in the Kaikouras and Southern Alps. After clocking hours upon hours in the skies,…
It’s a valid question, and one we’ve been hearing a bit, but unfortunately we really don’t have the answer. Following the Kaikoura Earthquake, slow-slip events have been observed simultaneously in the Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay, and now Kapiti regions. We’ve been observing slow-slip events in these regions (and Manawatu) for 15 years now, and we’ve never seen them happen in multiple locations all at once. But we’ve never tracked slow-slip events after a large magnitude 7.8 earthquake,…

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